Email: li.jian@pku.edu.cn

phone: +86 10 62767123(O)

Dr. Jian Li is a Principal Investigator at the Department of Psychology, and the IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research at Peking University. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuroeconomics at Baylor College of Medicine in 2007, and a M.B.A. degree in Economics from New York University in 2010. He was a Research Scientist at the Department of Psychology before he came back to China in 2012. Dr. Li is interested in human neural mechanisms and cognition relating to reward-based learning and decision-making, and was supported by the Chinese National “1000 Young Talent” program, Ministry of Science & Technology “973” grant, and Chinese National Science Foundation.

List of Publications

McClure, S.M.*, Li, J.*, Tomlin, D., Cypert, K.S., Montague, L.M. and Montague, P.R. (2004) Neural Correlates of Behavioral Preference for Culturally Familiar Drinks. Neuron, 44: 379-87.

Li, J.*, McClure, S.M.*, King-Casas, B. and Montague, P.R. (2006) Policy Adjustment in a Dynamic Economic Game. PLoS ONE 1(1): e103. *Authors contributed equally to the work.

Bogacz, R., McClure, S.M., Li, J., Cohen, J.D. and Montague, P.R. (2007) Short-term Memory Traces for Action Bias in Human Reinforcement Learning. Brain Research, 1153: 111-21.

Strathearn, L., Li, J., Fonagy, P. and Montague, P.R. (2008) What’s in a Smile? Maternal Brain Responses to Infant Facial Cues. Pediatrics, 122(1): 40-51.

Delgado, M.R., Li, J., Schiller, D. and Phelps, E.A. (2008) The Role of Striatum in Aversive Learning and Aversive Prediction Errors. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B, 363(1511): 3787-3800.

Van den Bos, W., Li, J., Lau, T., Maskin, E., Cohen, J.D., Montague, P.R. and McClure, S.M. (2008) The Value of Victory: Social Origins of the Winner’s Curse in Common Value Auctions. Judgment and Decision Making 3: 483-492.

Li, J., Xiao, E., Houser, D. and Montague, P.R. (2009) Neural Response to Sanction Threats in Two- Party Economic Exchange. PNAS 106:16835-16840.

Dickerson, K.C., Li, J., Delgado, M.R. (2011) Parallel Contributions of Distinct Human Memory Systems During Probabilistic Learning. NeuroImage 55(1): 266-276.

Li, J., Delgado, M.R., Phelps, E.A. (2011) How Instructed Knowledge Modulates the Neural Systems of Reward Learning. PNAS 108(1): 55-60.

Li, J., Daw, D. (2011) Signals in Human Striatum are appropriate for Policy Update Rather Than Value Prediction. Journal of Neuroscience 31(14): 5504-5511.

Li, J., Schiller, D., Schoenbaum, G., Phelps, E.A. and Daw, D. (2011) Differential Roles of Human Striatum and Amygdala in Associative Learning. Nature Neuroscience 14(10): 1250-1252.

Jones, R.M., Somerville, L.H., Li, J., and Casey, B.J. (2011) Behavioral and Neural Properties of Social Reinforcement Learning. Journal of Neuroscience 31(37): 13039-13045.

Roesch, M.R., Esber, G.R., Li, J., Daw, N.D. and Schoenbaum, G. (2012) Surprise! Neural Correlates Linking Pearce-Hall and Rescorla-Wagner. European Journal of Neuroscience 35: 1190-1200.

Kishida, K.T., Li, J., Schwind, J. and Montague, P.R. (2012) New Approaches to Investigating Social Gestures in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Neurodevelopmental disorders 4-14.

Sip, K.E., Carmel, D., Marchant, J.L., Li, J., Petrovic, P., Roepstorff, A., McGregor, W.B. and Frith, C.D. (2013) When Pinocchio’s Nose does not Grow: Belief Regarding Lie-detectability Modulates Production of Deception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:16. Doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00016. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

Kubota, J.T., Li, J., Bar-David, E., Banaji, M.R. and Phelps, E.A. (2013) The Price of Racial Bias: Intergroup Negotiations in the Ultimatum Game. Psychological Science 24(12): 2498-2504.

Jones, R.M., Somerville, L.H., Li, J., Ruberry, E.J., Powers, A., Mehta, N., Dyke, J., Casey, B.J. (2014) Adolescent-specific patterns of behavior and neural activity during social reinforcement learning. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience 14(2): 683-97.

Kubota, J.T., Li, J., Bar-David, E., Banaji, M.R. and Phelps, E.A. (2015) All claims in the original article hold as stated: a response to arkes. Psychological Science 26(2): 246-8.